Tuesday, 30 August 2016

Achates Power responds to EPA's GHG move

Earlier this month, the US Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Transportation announced new greenhouse gas emissions and fuel efficiency standards for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. The announcement has brought forth praise and support.
Among letters in The Detroit News a few days ago was the following from David Johnson, president and chief executive officer of Achates Power Inc., of San Diego, California which is developing opposed-piston diesel engines. Johnson writes:
“Thanks to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for finalizing new truck efficiency standards for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. The new standards will save nearly two billion barrels of oil, $170 billion in fuel costs, and reduce carbon pollution by 1.1. billion metric tons over the lifetime of vehicles sold under the program.
“As a global engine development company focused on engineering fuel efficient, clean transportation, we are helping to ensure that vehicles are significantly more efficient and emit less harmful emissions. We strive to do so without affordability constraints for customers or profit concerns for manufacturers. Achates Power’s radically improved Opposed-Piston Engine (OP Engine) can go a long way towards achieving the goals of the new program.
“Package delivery vans, tractor-trailers, buses, and other large trucks account for seven percent of all vehicles on the roads but consume a quarter of all transportation fuel. The new rule, finalized last week, will make trucks cleaner, more efficient, while accelerating innovation in this growing sector.”
COMMENT. The question is, however: How long will industry have to wait before Achates’ engines appear on the road? And Achates is not the only company developing opposed-piston diesel engines.



1 comment:

Willy Persson said...

Achates claims that they will " by 2018 will have a 50 percent more efficient three-liter three-cylinder engine that will be suitable for passenger cars and trucks."

http://www.voanews.com/a/this-internal-combustion-engine-is-50-percent-more-efficient/3250128.html